AZ-Loc https://www.az-loc.com Chinese Translation Service, Localization, Video Translation, Subtitling & Chinese Voice-overs Tue, 22 May 2018 10:47:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 https://www.az-loc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-az-loc_LOGO_transparent-300px-32x32.png AZ-Loc https://www.az-loc.com 32 32 5 Creative WeChat Campaigns That Tell Us Why Mobile Marketing Reigns https://www.az-loc.com/blog/how-to-attract-chinese-tourists Wed, 09 May 2018 08:00:23 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25551 If you have lived in China, you can resonate with my fascination at WeChat’s features. It makes our lives convenient when processing any online transaction. Let's find out why mobile marketing in China is crucial for business growth.

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5 Creative WeChat Campaigns That Tell Us Why Mobile Marketing Reigns in China

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

9 May 2018

If you have lived in China, you can resonate with my fascination at WeChat’s features.

It makes our lives convenient when booking a taxi, ordering our favorite meals, or processing any online transaction.

We can process mobile transactions in a few clicks and taps.

As of this writing, WeChat has already over 1 billion active monthly users. More citizens stay connected online using this mobile app.

Global companies are also exploring ways to take advantage of its features that can help them grow their businesses both offline and online.

READ MORE >>> How Much Does Mobile App Localization Cost?

As an avid (and daily) user of WeChat, we have compiled this list to show you how global companies use it in their mobile marketing strategies.

It will also give you some takeaways, which you can also implement in the future in case you want to launch your own WeChat marketing.

mobile marketing in China

#1 Hermès on using games to win over the millennial shoppers implicitly

The luxury brand is taking advantage of Chinese millennials’ purchasing power through creative strategies such as games (mobile apps) to win over their hearts. Launching a standalone mobile app called Hermès H-pitchhh, it’s a horseshoe pitching game where users can score points when they hit the stake.

While it does seem irrelevant to launch this mobile app, it requires practice and skills to unlock each level or the “worlds.”

Hermès creatively infused the drawings and bonuses about Emile Hermès hidden objects collections and also through its “Challenge Your Friend” feature, gamers can play with other friends virtually.

#2 Michael Kors on offline to online (O2O) strategy in partnership with Tiantianpitu

Michael Kors knows the selfie obsession of Chinese consumers. The luxury brand recently partnered with Tiantianpitu, a Chinese photo editing app to execute an offline to online strategy, targeting women who make the most of their core group.

Shoppers are encouraged to join and submit photos when they visit Michael Kors retail stores that have Tiantianpitu’s technology in the mirrors. They can take and edit pictures then share it on WeChat. Participants who submit their photos get a chance to win a Bristol handbag. Promo period was from March 23 to May 12.

#3 Cebu Pacific Air on content-focus posts to attract more bookings

The Philippine airline goes beyond the mainstream blogging like how western digital marketing works. Aside from posting the super cheap rates of roundtrip tickets, the company is publishing content on its official WeChat account.

Overseas companies can create official WeChat accounts so they can use that as their marketing channel to promote content, push content and other announcements. Think of it as the best way to subscribe to a company to get the latest updates.

#4 Walmart on mini-program for seamless payments while shopping

Despite the cut-throat competition in China through the years in the retail and e-commerce industries, Walmart took a huge step recently and opened its first high-tech supermarket in Shenzhen in collaboration with JD.com to tap the seamless payment experience while shopping.

Integrating offline and online shopping, this outlet will have more than 8000 items from stir-fried clams to fresh fruits, according to Reuters. They will be available online, and shoppers will receive the ordered items if they are within the 2-kilometer radius.

Payments are made via WeChat messaging and items are delivered as fast as 29 minutes.

#5 Starbucks “Say It With Starbucks” for a more personal experience

Last but not the least, Starbucks also had its creative way to promote its brand and simultaneously engage with its customers on a more personal level with the “Say It With Starbucks” product launched on WeChat.

Share or buy a cup for a friend using the interface integrated into WeChat and consumers can write blessings and send them to friends and family.

Digital gift cards (or e-gift cards) are not new among digital marketers in China, but being able to integrate into the WeChat interface can be an effective way to monetize and also tap mobile users.

build your business in china today

chinese elearning localization

Global companies are also exploring ways to take advantage of its features that can help them grow their businesses both offline and online.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

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How to Attract Chinese Tourists Even When You’re Not in China https://www.az-loc.com/blog/how-to-attract-chinese-tourists Wed, 02 May 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25538 Is it possible to attract Chinese tourists without having a presence in China? As outbound travelers increase every year, here are some of the practical tips that companies can do to grow their businesses using internet and language solutions.

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How to Attract Chinese Tourists Even When You’re Not in China

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

2 May 2018

You don’t have to be in Mainland China to grow your business.

Well. That is a half-truth. We still believe that presence in the market plays a significant factor to understand the behavior and engage with the consumers.

But we also want to share our insights in this post that even if you’re not in China for the meantime, and you see the increasing number of tourists in your city, then this is a good read for you.

READ MORE >>> 10 Tips on China Business Etiquette 101: Why Go East?

It’s because this growing trend, where more Chinese are willing to travel this year, is an opportunity for overseas companies to attract potential customers.

According to China National Tourism Administration, “98% of Chinese citizens were willing to take trips in 2017. 43.2 % of them were willing to take an adventure and explore natural scenery and cultural customs, 34.2% tourists want to relax and reduce pressure during the trips.”

Here are practical ways to start small and then scale the strategy in the future.

chinse tourists in hong kong

#1 Invest in language solutions

If you own a restaurant, as dining while traveling is one of the ways for tourist to experience the place and the culture, you may want to start translating your Food and Beverage collaterals such as menus, advertisements, and food descriptions.

Just like any other tourist, having to read the menu in your own language makes all the difference—consumers are likely to purchase a product or service if they understand it and feel like home.

According to Harvard Business Review, based on Common Sense Advisory’s survey. 50% of consumers consider language more than the price.

#2 Localize payment channels

Another way to attract more tourist is to have localized payment channels in your stores or shops. One of the widely used payment method – which only takes a few seconds to pay someone via mobile phone – is via WeChatPay.

The cashless society does exist. And living and traveling within China is so convenient that you don’t need to bring cash when paying merchants.

And once you go out of China, it’s quite strange to go back to paying merchants using cash, which is a bit hassle because you need to change currency when traveling.

Would it be nice if merchants overseas, especially if they are really serious about attracting Chinese consumers would accept WeChatPay or Alipay both for brick-and-mortar shops and also in their online portals?

Did you know most consumers use WeChatPay in retail shops, restaurants, and traveling?

#3 Explore offline to online promotional strategies

While most companies today see the potential of digital marketing strategies to help them grow their business, one of the things that they can also learn from Chinese companies like Alibaba is the combination of offline and online strategies to attract more customers.

For brick and mortar shops and also restaurants, this could be a gateway for engaging customers by providing real-life, meaningful customer experience, and then with a continuity of the cycle by engaging them online via mobile strategies.

A quick win for companies is to use QR codes in their ads as opt-ins for tourists that can lead them to a Chinese landing page about other products and services they offer.

China, as CNN Money put it, can’t get enough of QR codes as these are the most effective ways to promote and sell products and services.

build your business in china today

chinese elearning localization

Outbound tourism increases every year. More people want to travel abroad, so how can you promote your business even if you’re not in China?

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

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Top 10 Trends in China Market this 2018: A Guide for Global Companies https://www.az-loc.com/blog/10-trends-in-china-market-2018 Mon, 26 Feb 2018 12:00:38 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25454 If you're not yet ready to go full-blast on Chinese website translation, investing in an attractive, compelling Chinese landing page can be your first step.

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Top 10 Trends in China Market this 2018: A Guide for Global Companies

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

26 February 2018

The China market is progressive in many ways.

If you have been following the market trends – in general, and also in the internet sector for many years – you have probably seen the transformation of how domestic and global companies operate.

The way they do business, how they capitalize resources and talents, and how they maximize their knowledge and experience of the market—only show that global companies should be equipped before they expand in the Mainland and even overseas.

What was once known as the manufacturing hub of the west is becoming an innovation superpower as World Economic Forum put it.

READ MORE >>> Chinese Translation and Localization Playbook on Business Growth

china market tips

With 751 million internet users as of July 2017 and a whopping 54.3% internet penetration, which is 1.1.% higher than in 2016, global companies should never overlook digital marketing and “Internet-centric” approach strategies to engage with their audience effectively.

Let’s take a look at the latest trends below and may this list serve as a guide for global companies, an overview of the market, and what to expect in the next few years.

#1 Cashless society via mobile payments

China is already living in the future with its cashless society powered by mobile payments in WeChat. And this trend will continue to grow as two payment giants, AliPay and WeChatPay, have further consolidated their popularity as the South China Morning Post put it, which are the preferred payment options among China’s wealthiest individuals.

Mobile payments have made the lives of residents more convenient when making transactions in Chinese cities. Whether they are shopping online, buying from small-scale vendors and convenient stores, or paying their dinner in a fancy restaurant, all it takes is a few taps and money is transferred quickly.

#2 Lower-tier cities are growing and are catching up with e-commerce

There is a high saturation of mobile usage and e-commerce sector in megacities. However, this doesn’t mean that global companies should stop exploring other cities. In fact, consumers in lower-tier cities are growing and are expected to spend more. According to Morgan Stanley’s report, their expected spending power could reach up to U$9.7 trillion dollars by 2030.

Global companies should watch out for these small cities, which are likely to drive growth in the next few years. These lower-tier cities provide opportunities for investors and global entrepreneurs, especially those that are in the consumer goods, domestic autos, travel, entertainment, and gaming industries.

Xuzhou and Nantong in the east, Quanzhou in the south, or Baoding in the north are some of the places that will drive national consumption, Robin Xing, China Chief Economist said.

#3 Live streaming is another way to promote products and services

As consumers become more digitally savvy and connected online, global companies need to diversify their marketing channels to engage with their target audience. Live streaming, China’s booming industry, may have reached its zenith. And although there are regulatory hurdles and rising costs involved, the luxury market can capitalize on this channel with the right strategy.

Leading luxury brands had started exploring this channel, and many advertising companies also take advantage of this model aside from the traditional video promotions. Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Dior, and among others offered live streams of their fashion shows across the main social media channels.

#4 Domestic brands are becoming popular

The domestic brands have started innovating and creating their products and services, which are becoming popular in the Mainland and outside of China. We say goodbye to China’s former identity as being a copycat, but rather the rise of these domestic brands prove that they can compete on a global scale.

This smartphone advertisement from AGM-X2 is hilarious, yet it’s something a digitally savvy millennial would love to buy. And despite China still struggling to build a global fashion brand, it can thrive within its borders as the middle-class’ income grow and talented fashion designers in Shanghai are making it big in the industry.

#5 Sharing economy a booming industry and attracting financial growth

Sharing economy is a booming industry is attracting more investors, which garnered US$778 billion of transactions in 2017. The market is also attracting financial growth where investment volume rose 25.7 percent in 2017. Popular ridesharing company Didi Dache remains the leading player in the transportation sector, beating Uber in the domestic market, which resulted in acquiring the latter in 2016.

Young Chinese consumers are embracing the sharing economy and are eager to pay for the services and spend money on experiences rather than tangible things according to Euromonitor. As on-demand services grow, localize sharing economy such as bike sharing is one of the growing markets. Ofo and Mobike are two major players in the bike sharing and had already expanded outside of Mainland.

#6 The rise Copy to China (C2C) business model in IT sector

You have probably come across the phrase “the Google of China” or the “Twitter of China” in various articles. These platforms exist because domestic companies such as Baidu who owns the most popular search engine in China understand the market better than their foreign counterparts. The tech-giants, also known as BAT – Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent – localize the western business model to suit the needs of the consumers.

C2C business model refers to a company in China that copies the successful foreign company and then the degree of copying varies as to ensure it matches the needs of the local market, particularly touching the Chinese IT industry. The rise of C2C also fueled the growth of e-commerce and sharing economy.

While some may see this as nothing but “copying,” it’s an interesting topic of discussion how companies in China move beyond the copying and localization into innovation of their products and services.

Who else can create a seamless payment method and where you can almost do anything and everything within an app than Tencent?

#7 WeChat remains the “King of the Hill and invincible

There’s no doubt that WeChat remains the King of the Hill when it comes to mobile app usage. Known as the Swiss army knife app where you can do almost anything and everything within the app, what makes it invincible is that Tencent is smart enough when it comes to diversifying its services.

Aside from being customer-centric with a ton of new updates and features, which lock the user to almost do anything – and even have a conference call – just within the app, it offers a variety of mobile marketing options for business owners such as ads, pop-up programs, games, and mini-programs app.

Tencent is so good at building its user base that it’s so hard for companies not capitalize its technology and robust data.

#8 The booming domestic and outbound tourism

The travel and tourism sectors offer opportunities for global companies as annual records keep on increasing. The Spring Festival this March was reported to have 6.5 million travelers, the highest record number ever according to Ctrip, China’s biggest online travel platform. Many travelers prefer traveling overseas as their income increases.

This trend is an opportunity for the travel and tourism companies to explore new opportunities even if they’re not operating in China. As more Chinese travelers spend money overseas, localization of the marketing channels, products, and services is not bound by location.

Their customers may be right in front of their shops.

#9 China’s online education sector and the middle-class anxiety

Learning the English language is not an option for the middle-class especially now that China is becoming an influential global leader in many sectors. One of the middle-class anxiety as the academic circles put it, is that they might be left behind by their peers who are proficient in English. This pressure arises from a constant fear where some of their peers get ahead of the game as globalization takes place.

“Most important of all, many people worry that the worth and utility of their knowledge and qualifications could erode due to thriving technological progress, globalism, and entrepreneurship,” China.org wrote.

“This sentiment of continuous progress is propelling young white-collar workers toward a long-term remedy: education,” said Du Miaomiao, an analyst at consultancy iResearch.”

#10 Artificial intelligence (AI) and augmented reality (AR) to become a reality slowly

The artificial intelligence/AI and augmented reality/AR sectors are still nascent in China market. And while many domestic companies still struggle how to harness these technologies in their business models, Chinese attractions have invested in AR to engage with the customers.

“More than anywhere else in Asia, China has grasped the power of technologies such as holograms and augmented reality to engage a generation of travelers seeking new thrills. At least 17 billion yuan ($2.7 billion) of venture capital poured into the nation’s travel sector in the two years through 2016,”  Lulu Yilun from Bloomberg wrote.

Aside from travel and tourism, the gaming and entertainment sectors may experience more of this technology as companies continue to innovate and explore this technology. For example, AI technology is being integrated online and offline games, which allows gamers to enjoy both digital and real life like the Werewolf and Walkup games developed by Chinese companies.

Chen Yang, the founder of Walkup, said, “The gamification of a product is the future trend. In the game, we establish a motivating mechanism, encouraging users to exercise offline. In their daily routine, users enjoy the game, interact with their friends and achieve their goals of exercising every day. This is how we gain user loyalty.”

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

Here are the trends in China market this 2018. The best time to build your business is now.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

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What You Should Know About Cantonese and Mandarin Dialects https://www.az-loc.com/blog/cantonese-and-mandarin Mon, 19 Feb 2018 16:00:53 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25461 What are the differences between Cantonese and Mandarin dialects? This post will also give you clarity which dubbing services you should use for English videos.

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What You Should Know About Cantonese and Mandarin Dialects

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

19 February 2018

Are you planning to publish a video with Mandarin voiceover?

Maybe you’re thinking you should also consider dubbing it in Cantonese. But what are the differences between the two?

In this post, we listed the differences between the two spoken languages to help you in your video marketing strategy and insights as takeaways.

READ MORE >>> Chinese Translation and Localization Playbook on Business Growth

**1 GEOGRAPHY: Where it is widely used**

The two major spoken Chinese languages are Mandarin and Cantonese. Although they are technically “Chinese” they are being used in different regions.

About two-thirds of China’s population use Mandarin or Putonghua while 55 million speakers use Cantonese in China.

Mandarin is the lingua franca of China. It’s the official state language and it’s also used in Taiwan and Singapore.

Of course, megacities such as Beijing and Shanghai use it but other provinces still use their dialects.

Cantonese, on the other hand, is used in Hong Kong, Macau, and most of Guangdong province and some people in eastern part of Guangxi region use it, too.

**2 TONES: 5 tones vs. at least 6 tones**

Mandarin has four tones and one neutral tone, which technically makes it a five-tone dialect.

While both dialects are tonal languages where one sound has many meanings depending on the speaker’s pronunciation and intonation. Cantonese has at least six tones – 6 phonemic tones and 3 checked tones.

**3 GRAMMAR AND LEXICON: what are the differences **

Both dialects share the same base alphabet and Cantonese shares some vocabulary with Mandarin.

But the two are mutually intelligible when it comes to pronunciation, grammar, and lexicon.

There are also differences in terms of sentence structure like some placement of verbs. Cantonese has different grammatical particles.

**When should you use Mandarin voiceovers?**

Now that you see the significant differences between the two, it’s likely that Mandarin will be your first choice when it comes to voiceovers and dubbing.

For starters, we suggest that you use Mandarin promotional videos for your Mainland audience and also the Chinese diaspora. The residents living in abroad also use this spoken language.

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

Need Mandarin voiceovers for your English videos? It’s the lingua franca in Mainland China.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

Want new articles before they get published?
Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

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5 Megacities in China Where You Can Start Your Business https://www.az-loc.com/blog/megacities-in-china-business Mon, 12 Feb 2018 12:00:32 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25449 If you’re planning to set up your Chinese headquarters, you may want to take a look at these megacities as your starting point and see if your industry is a good fit in the area.

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5 Megacities in China Where You Can Start Your Business

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

12 February 2018

Still thinking where to build your business?

If you’re planning to set up your Chinese headquarters, you may want to take a look at these megacities as your starting point and see if your industry or company’s needs are a good fit in the area.

Global entrepreneurs consider a variety of factors when choosing a city. Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou, for example, are the go-to cities of multinational companies because they’re the business, government, financial, and industrial centers.

READ MORE >>> 8 Breathtaking Spots to Visit this Autumn in China

But there are also some exceptions as emerging cities in China are also growing regarding GDP per capita and economic growth. They are also attracting more investments as the government continuously invest in transportation infrastructure to connect primary and emerging cities across China.

Here are the five megacities you may want to start with:

#1 Chongqing

megacities in china chongqing

Chongqing is located in southwest China, which is one of the famous tourist destinations. It’s a direct-controlled municipality like Beijing, Shanghai, and Tianjin, and an economic hub of upper Yangtze basin.

It’s one of the old industrial bases and the industrial center of major automobiles, iron and steel, aluminum, and electronics companies. Computer and technology companies such as Foxconn and Inventec from Taiwan have set up plants in the area.

Top sectors: automobiles, communication and electronics, railway, ship, and transport equipment, processing of food, raw chemical materials, and chemical products.

#2 Shanghai

where to build your business in china

Shanghai is one of the major business hubs in China as hundreds of multinational companies set up their offices and headquarters in the city. Strategically located on the east coast, it’s China’s financial center.

Having the busiest container port, it is one of the fastest growing cities and known as a trading and shipping hub. The city has a complex transportation system composed of metros, buses, and taxis.

Many start-up companies build their businesses in the city because of the active expat networks and support. It’s also becoming a lifestyle tech start-up hub as SCMP put it.

Top sectors: automotive manufacturing, communications, computer, and electronic equipment, electrical machinery, smelting and pressing of ferrous metal.

#3 Beijing

beijing as mega city

Beijing is the capital of China and the world’s second most populous city proper.

With the development of modern service sectors, including the cultural and creative industries, many multinational – from Fortune 500 to startup companies – are flocking to the city to take advantage of the developments and programs that fill their needs.

There’s a considerable consumption demand from the locals and tourists, making it as one of the biggest markets in China. According to Beijing Municipal Commission of Commerce, new foreign companies hit 1,309 in 2017, an increase of 22% year on year.

Top sectors: telecommunications equipment, transportation equipment, chemicals, machinery, metallurgy and food making.

#4 Chengdu

Aside from being home to Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding, Chengdu is also attracting foreign companies as it pushes itself to become China’s Silicon Valley.

According to a report, there were 7,091 foreign investment enterprises at the end of 2015, and 2,727 of them are companies.

Top sectors: wholesaling and retailing, commercial and lease services, manufacturing, IT, accommodation and catering.

#5 Tianjin

China has a thing when it comes to building megacities. Tianjin, another city located in northern China, which is part of the Bohai Bay Economic Zone, one of China’s economic regions.

Strategically located near Beijing, and the Binhai International Airport as China’s major freight center, the Tianjin port caters to 400 ports in more than 200 countries.

It’s also the modern mechanic and textile hub of China and the go-to city of electronics and IT companies.

Top sectors: smelting and pressing of ferrous metal, communications, computers, electronics, motor vehicles manufacturing, food manufacturing

 

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

Thinking where to build your business?

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

Want new articles before they get published?
Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

The post 5 Megacities in China Where You Can Start Your Business appeared first on AZ-Loc.

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10 Things About Chinese New Year That Will Make You Appreciate the Culture https://www.az-loc.com/blog/10-things-about-chinese-new-year Mon, 05 Feb 2018 12:00:25 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25445 The Chinese New Year is one of the oldest festivities around the world. While its the exact date remains unknown, it was believed it started in the Shang Dynasty around 1766 BC - 1122 BC.

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10 Things About Chinese New Year That Will Make You Appreciate the Culture

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

5 February 2018

The Chinese New Year is one of the oldest festivities around the world. While its exact date remains unknown, it was believed it started in the Shang Dynasty around 1766 BC – 1122 BC.

One of the highlights of the New Year, which is also known as the Spring Festival, is the reunion of family members. This annual celebration was known to be the biggest human migration in the world.

Citizens return to their hometowns via trains, planes, and cars. Others opt to travel abroad to celebrate it.

READ MORE >>> 10 Useful Chinese Phrases When Traveling In China

Let’s take a look at the 10 interesting things about it that will make us appreciate the culture and the celebration itself.

Chinese new year festiivities

1. Unlike the official New Year and Christmas celebrations in the Gregorian calendar, the Chinese New Year is celebrated in different dates every year. It is based on the lunar calendar that usually falls between January and February. This year, it will begin in February 16.

2. It’s the longest holiday in China that lasts up to 15 days or more while the travel season lasts up to 40 days. Millions of people return home to be reunited with their families, which only shows that the Chinese culture has a strong family-oriented worldview, a characteristic of most East Asian countries like Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, and among others.

3. It’s a global festivity where various countries prepare different shows, festivals, and programs to celebrate it. There are fireworks displays in major cities during the New Year’s eve, and also cultural shows that depict the culture. For example in London, there are performances and parade on the Trafalgar Square. Chinatowns in cities all over the world have dragon and lantern parades on the streets.

4. Red is a prominent color in the culture and traditions. Some people decorate their homes with “Chunlian” or red paper strips and couplets that convey messages of good luck and health. These are placed on windows and doors.

5. Aside from these, people also clean their homes before the New Year. Cleanliness is important because they believe cleaning the properties brings good fortune and expels the evil spirits. Buying new clothes and shoes symbolizes an auspicious beginning.

6. It’s a good practice of Chinese people to settle their outstanding debts before the New Year. It signifies good fortune for businesses as well. The belief is to begin the year with a lot of energy and good vibes with friends and business associates.

7. Family members gather in the evening before the first day of the New Year for dinner. This is a time of recreation, catching up, and just spending time with other family members as most of them are busy during the entire year of work in other cities or overseas.

8. Uncut noodles or the longer the better are served, which signifies longevity and long life. Of course, “jiao zi” or dumplings are the most popular food served. The New Year’s cake called “nian gao” symbolizes reaching a new height in the upcoming year.

9. Red envelopes that have cash inside also known as “hong bao” are popular in the celebration. Children received these red packets from the elders and even employees from their bosses “lao ban” and among others. Today, these red packets have become digital that it’s easy to give them via WeChat to friends, business associates, and employees. When you’re in China and you have a WeChat, it’s likely you’re going to receive a few hong baos from friends and acquaintances.

10. The celebration has become more digitized and more modern as domestic companies like Alibaba, Tencent, and among others are capitalizing on the festivities to give red packets, allow people to collect them using smartphones, offer deals, and other activities that also spur business growth on their part.

And for those who are not in China, people can experience and have a glimpse of the culture via CCTV New Year’s Gala or the Spring Festival Gala, which is broadcasted all over the world. It’s a variety show broadcast that features both traditional and contemporary performances of artists.

chinese elearning localization

Wishing everyone a joyous and prosperous New Year!

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Is a Chinese Landing Page a Good Investment? https://www.az-loc.com/blog/chinese-landing-page-investment Thu, 07 Dec 2017 12:00:39 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25378 If you're not yet ready to go full-blast on Chinese website translation, investing in an attractive, compelling Chinese landing page can be your first step.

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Is a Chinese Landing Page a Good Investment?

Maria Krisette Capati, Author

7 December 2017

Did you know there’s another way to test the market if you’re not yet ready to invest in a professionally translated Chinese website?

If you have a handful of website visitors coming from China or you already have a customer database but unsure how to build an effective bilingual website strategy, then this will help you understand your market.

A Chinese landing page is a good investment for short-term goals. Sophie and I recently had a discussion about it, and she shared her insights. Perhaps this post will help you in your decision-making process.

READ MORE >>> Chinese Translation and Localization Playbook on Business Growth

Chinese consumers are digitally-connected more than ever. Most of them use their mobile phones to browse, shop, and pay merchants. For example, they can easily transfer money via QR scans in WeChat Pay.

Almost everyone is hooked online and this opportunity can’t be overlooked by overseas companies, especially if they’re getting hits from Chinese users.

We recommend a Chinese landing page if you:

1. Small-business owner with a tight budget

Starting an online business requires you to invest in tools, hosting, and marketing campaigns to build your website and promote the products or services.

However, if you have a quite sizable amount of visitors coming from China and would like more exposure and provide basic info about your company, this is the cheapest way to do so.

As Sophie put it, “Chinese landing page is the fastest and cheapest way to engage with your Chinese audience. The price/value ratio is highest in the short term.”

Fastest because all you need to do on your side is provide us short and punchy English text or copies that we need to translate without you setting up hosting servers or build a Chinese website. Cheap because it would only cost you less than $70 USD.

2. Increase your exposure and focus on short-term goals

The Chinese landing page, aside from the translated copywriting materials, also comes with basic SEO – Chinese keywords and phrases – to help you get indexed on local search engines.

If you only want to test the market or in the pilot stage, then you may settle for this but don’t expect long-term results.

This is also for serious companies that already have a global strategy; they can use a landing page to create a sneak preview of what they want to launch in the China market for long-term.

The landing page can also be used as a platform to offer a digital product for free in exchange for their information that you can use in the future.

3. Don’t want to invest in hosting costs

If you want to spare yourself from being entangled by hosting requirements and technical aspects of the business, then a Chinese landing page will not even require you to register a dot-CN or dot-COM domain name when hosting to HK servers.

As Sophie put it, “These types of domains are only available in mainland China plus you need to register a physical entity in China as one of the preliminary requirements. Not to mention, obtaining ICP from the Internet authority takes much longer time than site creation, hosting, and other marketing efforts involved combined.”

It’s a good investment for short-term goals

Think of this recommendation as a temporary solution to achieve your short-term goals. There are caveats when you invest in a page that’s entirely Chinese but then when they visit or are directed to your website, it’s entirely English, which forfeits the goal of hooking the customers to buy the product or service, a bad user experience and most likely they will drop the sessions on your site.

Let us know if this quick, temporary solution is for you.

 

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

A Chinese landing page can be a temporary solution to achieve your short-term goals.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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4 Smart Ways to Get it Right on Chinese Translation Projects https://www.az-loc.com/blog/get-it-right-on-chinese-translation-projects Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:00:13 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25372 For a hassle-free experience, here's a checklist on how to get it right on Chinese translation projects and save more money.

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4 Smart Ways to Get it Right on Chinese Translation Projects
Maria Krisette Capati, Author
24 November 2017

Is Chinese translation a source of frustration?

Entrepreneurs may either consider translation a valuable strategy for globalization or a waste of money.

The latter notion was probably inked in their minds because of bad experiences from previous translation vendors—but if done right especially when it comes communication, objectives, and essentials, it can be a hassle-free experience.

READ MORE >>> Chinese Translation and Localization Playbook on Business Growth

Whether you’re a first-time translation buyer or a veteran entrepreneur who has worked with a few of agencies and freelance translators and was pissed off by their services, we hope that this piece will give you more clarity and more “Aha! Moments” on how to get it right when working with a pool of talented Chinese translators.

1. Let the professional translators vet/filter the documents

Sometimes, all is not advisable. And what do we mean by that? There are instances you might think that you need to translate all the documents as your in-house team sees this as a good investment. But sometimes, that’s not the case.

An outsider like a professional linguist or translator can take a look at your documents first and see which one should be included. Just because you think a portion sounds right, it doesn’t mean it’s useful to the entire translated piece, especially on manuals and user guides.

So we suggest that an expert Chinese translator will check first all the documents for vetting before you go full blast on the translation process.

Our goal: to get rid of the redundancies and save you more money especially on hundreds or thousands of pages.

2. Let the pictures tell your story

If you have marketing materials – brochures, flyers, guide, etc. – capitalize on the power of pictures to tell your story or articulate what you want to say to your target market. It may only require a few text over here and there, but it just makes sense to translate what is only needed and lowers the cost.

You can use graphs, stock photos, diagrams, and if you’re the creative type, drawings and paintings that match the translated texts in Chinese. Remember, colorful and vibrant ads are more attractive to your audience.

Adopt a “less is more” approach to content and choose your words wisely.

Our goal: to lessen the technical jargons and simplify the content while “marrying them up” with the pictures for more impact.

3. Clarity on your target audience

China is a huge, diverse market and most people speak Mandarin or write Simplified Chinese. These are the standards in terms of general communication, but some places like the SAR Hong Kong and Taiwan use different written and speaking forms.

Some people in Guangzhou speak Mandarin, but Cantonese and Traditional Chinese are common in the southern part, including Hong Kong. And Taiwan, though they speak Mandarin, uses the Traditional Chinese in written form.

There should be clarity on the target market. Where you want to distribute your content, whether a promotional video, a website or a manual.

Our goal: to maximize the pool of talents we have, whether they are Cantonese or Mandarin speakers and ensure you receive the correct forms for the ads.

4. Prepare a style guide or handbook of your terminologies

Style guides are a huge help not just for professional translators and linguists but also for you in the long run. Companies in various industries use different terminologies and verbiage, and having a guide or rundown of these will make the translation process efficient.

Same way, in case you want to translate your documents to other languages, non-English speakers and linguists will have a guide and to avoid that pressing question, “What does this word mean to them?”

Our goal: to ensure that even the draft itself has a coherent flow of the sentence structure, grammar, and style and better word choices that match your industry’s verbiage.

Remember, human translators are your friends

And most of all, resist the temptation of doing it by yourself especially when it comes to the Chinese language. Machine translations are helpful, no doubt about that, but nothing beats a human translator’s touch on your documents.

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

How to get it right on Chinese translation projects. Because if there’s a will, there’s a way. And it can be stress-free on your side.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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5 Signs Your Chinese Website is Well-Optimized for Your Market https://www.az-loc.com/blog/chines-website-well-optimized Sat, 18 Nov 2017 10:00:36 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25346 A well-optimized Chinese website, aside from the translation and localization of content, also includes SEO best practices and social media APIs.

The post 5 Signs Your Chinese Website is Well-Optimized for Your Market appeared first on AZ-Loc.

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5 Signs Your Chinese Website is Well-Optimized for Your Market
Maria Krisette Capati, Author

18 November 2017

There are several factors involved in website optimization.

What makes a website great is not just the looks and fancy banners, but also the overall content and backend structure.

A well-optimized Chinese website, aside from the translation and localization of content, also includes SEO best practices such as site submission and correct integration of social media APIs.

READ MORE >>> When Should You Translate Your Website Into Chinese? 

According to Common Sense Advisory via Harvard Business Review, they found out “72.1% of consumers spend most or all of their time on websites in their own language,” while “2.4% of consumers said they would be more likely to buy a product with information in their own language.”

Below are the best practices for web optimization, especially if you recently launched a Chinese website.

Chinese website optimization mcdonald sample

1. Webmaster tools are integrated into your website

Just like how English website works where Google webmaster tools are also installed at the backend, you also need to open a Baidu Webmaster account to access the features – everything is in Chinese – with the help of SEO specialists to interpret and analyze data.

Opening an account would also require a Chinese mobile number for the verification process. If you need help on this, our team can assist you.

2. It’s submitted to the Baidu search engine

Do you want to know how to impress Baidu algorithms? According to Hermes Ma, a Search Engine Journal contributor and a digital marketer based in China, it’s best to start with a few pages but with robust, high-quality content per page. This gives Baidu an impression that you know how to organize content.

Because if you launch a new site with many pages but almost empty or duplicated content this will lead to a disastrous ending and it’s difficult to win Baidu’s trust.

As Ma put it, “If you fail to make a good “first impression,” Baidu then allocates fewer resources crawling your site in the future.”

To solve this problem, the SEO specialist or webmaster can disallow the website during the UAT (User Acceptance Test).

3. The content is localization for your audience

While this is self-explanatory, which means it does require a professional translator to translate the texts, this also includes localization of layout if needed, and the nitty-gritty elements such as colors, the time and date format, keywords, meta descriptions, tags, and more.

For a comprehensive approach to localization, companies also translate their tagline in Chinese, tweak some the colors of the brand and ad copies to suit the preferences of the target audience. Banners and pop-ups are likely colorful and flashy, instead of a following the brand’s colors.

4. The social media app APIs and local payment gateways are installed

One of the most important small, yet important website elements is the integration of social media API that will be easier for visitors to follow or opt-in using the local social media channels.

Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter and other mainstream social media accounts are not available and popular in China. WeChat and Weibo are the popular ones and Chinese visitors can easily follow you and engage with your brand through these channels.

For e-commerce websites, APIs are critical for the overall user experience especially for opt-ins, logging in, and payment transactions.

5. Loads faster and mobile responsive

Mobile responsiveness should be a priority when it comes to content localization. The layout on the desktop is sure is different from what it looks like on mobile. There might be some elements on the mobile layout that you need to include or disregard based on your goals.

Page speed should be improved. Fortunately, Baidu offers MIP or Mobile Instant Pages that optimizes the website page loading speed. We also mentioned this in our previous post, 5 Things You Should Know About Baidu. What MIP does, it imports a page into the MIP server as a cache, resulting in an improved page weight when the visitor browses the mobile version.

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

Why website optimization for Chinese consumers is important

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

The post 5 Signs Your Chinese Website is Well-Optimized for Your Market appeared first on AZ-Loc.

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5 Best Practices in Chinese E-commerce Website Localization https://www.az-loc.com/blog/chinese-ecommerce-website-localization Sun, 12 Nov 2017 10:00:37 +0000 https://www.az-loc.com/?p=25355 Do you have a Chinese e-commerce website and would like to increase your revenue? Here are the five best practices in Chinese website localization.

The post 5 Best Practices in Chinese E-commerce Website Localization appeared first on AZ-Loc.

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5 Best Practices in Chinese E-commerce Website Localization
Maria Krisette Capati, Author

12 November 2017

It’s fascinating to observe, study, and compare English (or western e-commerce) and Chinese websites for business development and growth.

The goal, of course, is to help companies see the differences so they can apply the best practices that work for the Chinese shoppers rather than point out which one is better.

In one of our previous posts about western and Chinese websites; we shared the differences and why translation and localization contribute to growing the revenue as well as understand the market better.

READ MORE >>> E-commerce Market in China: Worth to Venture Out?

Let’s take a look at the famous e-commerce sites in China and find out how these indispensable website elements can generate more clicks, more sales, and better UI/UX for your target market.

1. Colorful and eye-catching banners and ads

Chinese e-commerce-website

Taobao is known for its orange hues as a brand, but when you visit the website – the go-to site of Chinese shoppers where they can almost buy anything and everything – the company uses a lot of vibrant, eye-catching banners, promotional ads. The slider on the homepage never fails to show all the special offers and items.

At a glance, the entire shopping site looks compact and cluttered for a western shopper, but for Chinese shoppers, this strategy converts well because, in just one page, everything they need is provided there.

2. Local social media networks are integrated into the website

chinese localization for ecommerce

Haitao is the ideal site for Chinese shoppers to buy imported products overseas. The website is all set for the 11-11 shopping craze and vibrant colors with hues of fuchsia, blue, and gold. But there are also essential elements that can’t be overlooked despite the grand design and layout: the social media icons.

They are positioned on the right side via dropdown menu. Icons of WeChat, Weibo, and QQ are integrated into the menu drop down bar for easy access and sharing.

3. Live chat with customer support

Another element that e-commerce sites should have, one of the best practices is to integrate a Live Chat support like how Uniqlo T-Mall does it. Though they set specific hours of the availability of the agents, having a live chat builds the image of the company as being responsive and customer-oriented.

Most foreign brands that sell their items on T-Mall have a live chat, and it makes the communication easier between the shopper and agent.

4. Payment gateways support WeChat & AliPay

Most transactions in China are paid via WeChatPay or AliPay these days. Customers don’t need to swipe a credit card even in brick-and-mortar shops, but instead, via QR code scans, they can instantly pay the merchant. Payment gateways should be integrated into the Chinese websites for smooth flow of the transactions.

This in-app mobile e-wallet allows users to send money, pay goods both offline and online. Companies planning to build a niche, e-commerce website should recognize the opportunities of this feature and be more “localized” when it comes to payment methods. And the good news is, Tencent will also make this payment method available to overseas vendors.

5. QR codes as opt-ins for marketing

E-commerce websites in China will not be complete with the famous QR codes that have changed the social media habits of consumers for the past years. Aside from payment opt-ins, these boxes with unique lines and designs serve as the call-to-action for consumers, both online and offline.

Marketers also print these QR codes on brochures, posters, flyers, etc., and consumers can easily scan the code and they are directed to a specific landing page or site of the products and promotional deals. Take a look at Taobao’s QR code that’s positioned on the lower right corner.

is chinese app localization for you

chinese elearning localization

Best practices we can learn from Chinese e-commerce websites to generate revenue.

krisette

 

Maria Krisette Capati

 

Krisette is a China-based writer and loves to cover disruptive technologies, digital trends in China, and a myriad of geeky and innovative topics. With 4 years experience in the Chinese market and startups, Krisette has gained her expertise as a China Internet specialist and is fascinated by its business ethics, language, and culture. She's a major of Business Management and Entrepreneurship and an advocate of faith-based non-profit organizations and women's rights. When she's not writing or dabbling with the team, she satiates her wanderlust as a digital nomad.

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Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

The post 5 Best Practices in Chinese E-commerce Website Localization appeared first on AZ-Loc.

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